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Wow--three hours. An NDE lasting just minutes can be powerful. Can you imagine what his must have been like? Lucky kid. (Since he apparently recovered fully.)

This reminds me of Melvin Morse's book, Closer to the Light, which recounts many children's NDEs, and which I highly recommend. The amazing thing is when very young children, like this three-year-old, have an NDE experience. At that age, they have difficulty even understanding the concept of death, and it's hard to believe they've been exposed to the idea of an NDE, much less understand it. And in these NDEs, they invariably encounter deceased relatives (and sometimes pets). If they were hallucinating, you'd think they'd encounter living people, such as their parents, or cartoon or story characters, but that's not what happens. The experiences of children like this seem to be some of the most convincing evidence of an Afterlife.

Speaking of children's NDE's, I find it intriguing that children and teenagers are the most probable candidates for encountering living people while experiencing an NDE. The live person is likely to be a favorite teacher, entertainer, or compassionate figure of authority - but never a living parent. The encounter is invariably calming and brief, at which point other entities take the lead. Ben Breedlove's rendezvous with Kid Cudi (his favorite rapper) is one famous example.

The need for living avatars for young people makes sense, since they (hopefully) aren't likely to have a multitude of dead folks on file that they would recognize to begin with.

i.e. encountering live people. If we live in a holographic universe that means whatever is "here" must also be "there." Theoretically our universe is a holographic projection from someplace else. People who have NDE's routinely describe what they experience in terms that parallel what one might expect if one were living on or in the original holographic film that our universe is a projection from.

So I don't find it off-putting when near death experiencers say they saw a living person on the other side. We exist "here" and "there" at the same time. Consciousness isn't bound by time or space. It can exist everywhere in the Universe at once.

It's interesting that there is a verse in the New Testament that says whatever we bind on Earth will be bound in Heaven. I take that to me that the things we love here will be waiting for us when we get to Heaven. We don't lose anything. All the things that we have loved and been separated from in this life will be there waiting for us in the next.

Bruce, we have no idea how long the NDE lasted, and given the atemporal nature of such cases - time appears to be elongated to an extraordinary degree - it's a moot point whether the boy was dead for 3 minutes or 3 hours. When you factor in the skeptical view that the experience occurs at the very beginning or end of unconsciousness as the brain is coming back "online", it's even less of an issue. I do get irate - can you tell? - when people assume a relationship between length of the clinically dead period and NDE phenomenology. There isn't any.

It should also be pointed out that reports of live persons during NDEs is very much a minority of cases, so it's reaching when skeptics use these cases to undermine the reality of NDEs.

Why do they never comment on these cases where the dying person reports meeting a relative who everyone thought WAS alive, only to find out later that the relative died a few days before?

I am so far past the "is it real" question that when other people inevitably bring it up I feel like just rolling my eyes. I think to myself, "I'm sorry you're so ignorant but there is no way I can convey to you the information I've learned over the past 13 years and condense it into two or three sentences so you'll know what I know."

Suffice it to say the connection between NDEs and quantum physics and the holographic universe theory have me convinced to a high degree of probability that "yes, it's real."

There is no easy way to explain it away and the chances of people who have NDE's making it up and it accidentally corroborating what I've gleaned from reading popular physics books and the holographic universe theory is very slim indeed.

Hey Michael, this is a really good article. I think you'd like it.

'Visions, Trips, & Crowded Rooms': Five common deathbed experiences -- from David Kessler

http://www.examiner.com/article/visions-trips-crowded-rooms-five-common-deathbed-experiences-from-david-kessler-video

" I do get irate - can you tell? - when people assume a relationship between length of the clinically dead period and NDE phenomenology. There isn't any."

Michael, from reading lots of accounts, it's my impression that, as a very general rule of thumb, the longer the duration of the body's incapacity, the more intense, varied, and interesting, the experience.

That's why I said what I did.

Dead,not dead. It's a very fine line in this life. We see it as being a big deal but in reality our consciousness might be floating in and out of the Spiritual Universe all the time. When we sleep our dreams might be visits to the other side. I have some really vivid dreams sometimes. Our soul may be very loosely attached to our body and it may exist in both dimensions at the same time. We may be sleeping up in Heaven right now only dreaming we are here. After all Niels Bohr said that everything we call real is made out of things that can't be considered as real. Einstein called reality a "persistent illusion." Sir James Jeans said that our Universe seems to be made of knowledge.

We got too much faith in this so called physical universe. It may not be as real as we believe it to be. In truth anything might be possible in a quantum holographic universe.

That's my impression, too, Bruce. Pam Reynolds' and Eben Alexander's NDEs would be cases in point.

"That's my impression, too, Bruce. Pam Reynolds' and Eben Alexander's NDEs would be cases in point. "

Thanks, Michael. Good to get another opinion on that.

I'm not sure I agree with the two of you regarding Bruce's rule of thumb. The fact is, there shouldn't be a relationship from a survivalest perspective, given the ostensible transcendental non-local nature of the NDE state. If there is a relationship, doesn't that suggest more prosaic factors are at play, that are governed by biology?

"The fact is, there shouldn't be a relationship from a survivalest perspective, given the ostensible transcendental non-local nature of the NDE state. If there is a relationship, doesn't that suggest more prosaic factors are at play, that are governed by biology?"

There *is* a key biological factor at work here. It's this--the more profoundly, and the longer, the biological system is "out of it," the greater the opportunity for the spiritual component to come into play.

That's exactly what you would expect, if the brain is a filter of consciousness rather than a producer. It's what we see in the NDE. I think it's also what we see in meditation, as cerebral activity subsides, and in psychedelic experiences, where, according to the latest research, blood flow to certain key areas decreases.

So that's how biology figures in--through its decreased (or even complete lack of ) involvement.

How does that not fit in with the survivalist perspective?

Now perhaps you're making the point that what happens to the NDEr in the physical world, doesn't *guarantee* any sort of experience in the spiritual, which is governed by a different kind of time (if any time at all).

And that's true. But there does seem to be a rough correlation between duration of the physical NDE, and how profound the spiritual experience is. At least, Michael and I have gotten that impression from our readings.

But I'm open to the possibility I'm wrong about this.

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