IMG_2361
Blog powered by Typepad

« Thinking makes it so | Main | An oldie but goodie: Reversalism, A Philosophy for Living It Up »

Comments

Tolstoy, like Shakespeare, is much better in the original Russian.

Быть или не быть,
Это - вопрос.

(Blimey, Typepad's better than I thought!)

Shakespeare is better in the original Russian?

Shakespeare is better in the original Russian? - MP

Perhaps it is! lol

How about that for a Shakespeare controversy?

Hey, I'm in the middle of Anna Karenina, too. Not as ambitious as you, though, I'm watching rather than reading. I chose the 1977 10-episode Masterpiece Theater version. (Instant streamed from NetFlix.)

It's good! And I'm glad the storytelling isn't quick. Nothing better, to my taste, than the opportunity to immerse myself in another time and place, and get to know some characters well.

"And I'm glad the storytelling isn't quick. Nothing better, to my taste, than the opportunity to immerse myself in another time and place, and get to know some characters well."

I don't mind getting to know the characters. What I find tedious are the lengthy, detailed discussions of Russia's socioeconomic problems. I would guess that little if any of this material made its way into the miniseries.

"What I find tedious are the lengthy, detailed discussions of Russia's socioeconomic problems. I would guess that little if any of this material made its way into the miniseries."

There was a bit of it. Not nearly as much as in the novel, I'm sure. Mostly from Costya, who, according to Wikipedia, is Tolstoi's mouthpiece. He's the character I related to most easily.

To clarify—I wasn't just saying that I like Costya because he grapples with economic and social issues. (Spiritual matters too, come to think of it, in his own agnostic way.)

More than that, I like the way he lives his life and relates to others. I can't imagine myself as anyone else in the book, really.

Levin (Kostya) is probably the most appealing character in the novel, and the one clearly patterned on Tolstoy himself. I must admit, though, to a certain sympathy for Alexei Karenin, the cuckolded husband, who is a bit of a martinet but conducts himself with as much dignity as possible under the circumstances. (At least so far - I'm only halfway through.)

Actually, the joke Brothers Karamazov filming sounds like the real production of the whole of Faust, Part Two from a few years ago. In general, though, if you want short works you should try German rather than Russian prose.

The comments to this entry are closed.