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Uri Geller writes in his biography "My Story" (available free on the internet) that many CEO's believe in psychic phenomena because they attribute their own success to their intuition. This attitude led to the way Geller says he made most of his money: dowsing for oil and minerals for large corporations.

Laura Day stands out from the crowd. She's been successfully charging corporate clients $10,000 per month for decades. She won't take more than five such clients, and she has a waiting list (I think). She wouldn't be able to do that without being a real psychic "star."

She can perform at the superstar level in ESP tests. I wish she would let her abilities be documented more by people like Radin.

This is what I've gathered from reading an article in NY magazine and one of her books. If anyone has more info about her, I hope they will post it here.

PS: She got out of stocks at the top (and got her clients to do so too), and (choosing her words carefully for TV) she predicts the economy "will be restructuring itself for a long, long time." (In her NY mag article she said she was surprised at the mildness of the downturn to date.)

Yes, I have more info on Laura Day. Or, perhaps it would be considered an alternative view of her.

It would seem from many NDE accounts that people endowed with talents and abilities have those abilities for different reasons than they have been using them for up to the point of the NDE. Such a case is Gordon Allen, a wealthy exec who was feared by many, and who became very rich. In his NDE he was told that the talents he has were meant to be used for a different reason than what he was using them for. He left all of his business world behind, and lives in a small place and dedicates his life to helping others spiritually, etc.

It seems like I'm among the minority that think Laura Day's earnings of $10,000,000 over the last few years are a perversion of what talent/ability she might have. I doubt spiritual endowments are handed out to become a multi millionaire while people in the world starve.

I take offense to her brash attitude about it, and her lack of humility. I hope Laura Day doesn't find out that HER endowments might have been for a greater purpose than some business exec getting the "better" of another exec and so on. I doubt money is of much importance in any kind of spiritual world.

I think Laura Day should be ashamed of brash materialism that she credits to spirituality. However, I suppose to those people who seek nothing but "proof" she will be a hero because she provides them with ammunition they need in order to fuel their desire for proof.

Laura Day is a sad case, in my opinion. I doubt any spiritual world is concerned for how rich she can get, and how rich her clients can get.

Hi Alec,

I've heard of other cases like the one you mentioned about Gordon Allen, where someone who has spiritual gifts is directed on one way or another to use them in a certain way. I wonder if Laura Day has recieved those types of hints and if she is ignoring them or if she hasn't recieved any? If not why not?

I feel a certain sympathy with your remarks but I also think is isn't my place to judge others.

What do you think she should do? Is it really necessary to drop all her business clients?

What should any psychic do when demand exceeds her ability to provide a service? In that situation it is natural to raise your fees until the demand decreases to match what you can supply. Rich people are just as entitled to access to psychic services as poor people are. Why shouldn't psychics charge rich people what they are willing to pay? Why do psychics have a greater responsibility than other business consultants to give away their services for below market rates?

If you go to her web site and look at her schedules she does give some free workshops at book stores (probably to help sell her books which might also help generate business customers).

I know a medium who is a pastor of a Spiritualist church who seems to have found a reasonable compromise. She teaches classes and gives readings outside the church for fairly high rates but provides similar services through the church for much less.

I don't know enough about Larua Day, and I don't think it's my place to judge her, but I do agree with you that psychic abilities are a gift that should be shared to some extent for the good of others. But, I also think psychics should be able to send their children to the best universities just like any successfull business person and that takes money.

Dear Alec

Do you have a link to that NDE case by any chance?

"I wonder if Laura Day has recieved those types of hints and if she is ignoring them or if she hasn't recieved any? If not why not?"

-I guess you'll never know...do you think she would tell you if you asked her?


"I feel a certain sympathy with your remarks but I also think is isn't my place to judge others."

-The new commandment: Thou shalt not judge anything.


"What should any psychic do when demand exceeds her ability to provide a service? In that situation it is natural to raise your fees until the demand decreases to match what you can supply."

-Or perhaps just emliminate the demand by not accepting anymore clients. It's natural for sure to do as you say...except it's only natural in a materialistic world.


"Rich people are just as entitled to access to psychic services as poor people are. Why shouldn't psychics charge rich people what they are willing to pay?"

-Or rich and average people could just pay the same, that would be reasonable wouldn't it? Why shouldn't psychics NOT charge average people what they are willing to pay?


"I know a medium who is a pastor of a Spiritualist church who seems to have found a reasonable compromise."

-Yes, I know several also. And most of them live near poverty because they will not overcharge anyone.


"Do you have a link to that NDE case by any chance?"

http://www.gordonallen.org/2/index.html

Hey Michael
I know this isn't related to this post, but you've said many times in previous posts that you don't think normal explanations account for the spoon bending at Jake Houke's PK Parties.
I found a video where Michael Shermer attended one of these 'parties' and sent some of the bent spoons off to be tested, and they were found to have been mechanically bent.
Heres the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3X9h1WlQpA
Just wondered what your thoughts were?
Thanks
Robbie

Just gotta say this Robbie

How would bending from psychic powers look any different from bending from regular means? Bending is bending after all and all bending involves some kind of pressure.

More I think about this how could the test indicate anything else? The only way to bend something is through pressure or it is formed bent. Obviously the spoon wasn't formed bent so it had to be bent through pressure be it psychic or mechanical. The only way to resolve this would be to.

a.) supply a clearly unaltered spoon
b.) watch them bend it checking for cheating.

I've been traveling and haven't looked at the Shermer video, but I once did see a video of a PK ("spoon-bending") party. At the end the participants - ordinary folks, including children - all walk out and show their bent cutlery to the camera. Some of the spoons were bent so tightly that the handles looked like corkscrews! I don't believe anyone could do that with the pressure of their fingers. And there would have been no opportunity to bend the spoons with the use of some secret hidden machinery - not to mention that all the participants would have to have been in on the scam.

I saw that video, and Shermer himself bent a spoon in the curvature of the spoon itself, a more difficult place to make a bend.

Shermer's explanation was "adrenalin." I think that's BS. Shermer doesn't know how he did it, he's just making up explanations. Yes, it's true that the spoon analysis showed the spoons were bent mechanically, but that is only relevant in regard to the suggested hypothesis (by the benders) that they might be producing enough heat to soften the metal.

While the analysis shows that heat had nothing to do with it, it doesn't explain how the spoons get so easily bent. And Shermer's claim of adrenaline is a claim like any other claim, which requires evidence to support it, which he has none of.

I don't know how it happens, but Michael Crichton observed in his own spoon bending exercise that it happens almost effortlessly.

If you want to say it's adrenaline then you have to: 1. Back that up with peer reviewed medical research that documents and measures the effect of adrenaline induced strength increase, 2. Document the adrenaline levels of a spoon bender before and after the successful bend, showing that the levels are higher during the bending than they were before the bending, and 3. Show that the amount of extra strength produced by the measured levels of adrenalin in a specific subject, added to his or her measured normal ability, is within range of the strength needed to bend a spoon.

That's a lot to do, but if you want to say it's adrenaline, that's the sort of thing you have to do to back up what you say. Shermer bent a spoon and failed to back up his explanation with anything but a flat assertion, which is no explanation at all.

That's why I call Shermer the Super Dave Osborne of skepticism. His stunts keep backfiring on him.

And if no one has ever seen a Super Dave skit before, there's lots on YouTube if you need a laugh:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCFl7AhduiA&feature=related

Thanks for the reponses, I was curious to see what others would think of Shermers 'explanations'. And I agree with you Kris Im not sure how else it could have been bent.
Anyway sorry for going off topic!
So yeah bad psychics...

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