IMG_1216 BW small
Blog powered by Typepad

« Quotable | Main | Not bright »

Comments

Well here is how i changed by worldview from being materialistic to being a dualist. First I had some personal experiences at first I thought whatever this can't be real I was in a state of denial then after they got more and mroe powerful I realize it was my igorance that was the reason why I did not accept what i was seeing also after that I had death phobia for a well that was spawn because I had social phobia before that however I got out of that. I then remembered the experiences I had and then I started to do a check on google on life after death the first website I came to was neardeath.com then I found victorzammit website and so on I researched extensively into the scole experiments,poltergeists,apparitions,ouija boards,cross-correspondences,the afterlife experiments,electronic voice phenomena,deathbed visions,near death experiences/out of body experiences etc. and I came to a personal conclusion that there is lots of evidence for life after death. Then I had two powerful premonitions in between me researching survival hyppthesis. One was seriously a premonition the night before sept 11th,2001 I remember two very tall building's together and one plane crashing into it then another one. I also saw the pentagon hit by a plane as well.

My other premonition was my cousin Dennis he was on a plane to come visit me and my parents well I had a premonition I saw in it lightening striking the airplane 3 times but the plane did not catch on fire what was weird was my mother called him in the morning he said the exact same thing i saw in the premonition he said lightening had struck the plane about 3 times. I have also research esp,telepathy,mind over matter experiments,remote viewing very interesting too.

thank you for your thoughtful response to my question.

i'm glad to have encountered many open-minded people like you and others on this blog. i have come to realize that while science is not the best tool to study the subjective nature of universe (such as consciousness, awareness, quantum mechanic, and personality), at the very least the scientific methods have kept us from blindly believing in something. like matthew's blog's title, science is a method not a position- i have learn to appreciate science as a method and learn to dislike science as a position held by many 'esteemed' scientists. i have become more critical about things that i've read, and i have to say that it frustrates me that there is no definitive answer since we live in a subjective universe. but knowing that nothing is ever certain gives me that glimmer of hope that anything is possible-

i do think that something does survival physical death- personality? i find that hard to believe since i believe that personality is also dependent on memories of experiences and genetic. i kind of agree with the tv antenna theory, but then it sounds like the memories are somehow stored in the brain (although we have yet localize the region of the brain for memory, and probably never will). anyway, there are just way too many weird things with the NDE, afterlife medium research, and apparitions for me to say that afterlife is just a wishful thinking. skeptics like to attribute those to hallucinations or brain deprived of oxygen, but come on, were they all hallucinating? i doubt it, and like what william james said, all you need is one case that show otherwise, then you can show it's not so.

someone once told me that ultimately the conviction can only come from personal experience. people who experienced those things became certain of them (sometime, too certain that they refuse all other possibility). i guess for me i just need to experience something like that to put me at ease.


i have a very easy life compare to most people, and i definitely have my family to thank for. and i've learned not to see things as good or bad anymore (also i still make snap judgments once in a while in personal matters). i learn to focus more on the experience, and pay more attention to the consequence of the event, and see how i make the best out of it (like karma, kind of). i found out that this change of perspective has made me a much more 'in the moment' kind of guy, and more positive and content about my life.

like you said, 'intellectual analysis isn't enough.' your actions have to match your belief. one is not wise because of what he knows; one becomes wise when he realizes how little he knows.

you just gotta 'walk the walk'

The intuition side is very interesting, especially from the physics point of view. In early 2001 a friend of mine who is an airline pilot got me some time on a Boeing 777 simulator at London Heathrow. At the end of the session I thought I would have a bit of fun and see what would happen if I crashed into one of the London buildings. With great ease on my first attempt I managed to fly straight into the Post Office Tower. After trashing the Houses of Parliament and Buckingham Palace I called it a day and went home. After that I had persistent nightmares about planes crashing into buildings and after 9/11 happened I did wonder if I had put my mind into some sort of time wormhole with my fun and games.

The intuition side is very interesting, especially from the physics point of view. In early 2001 a friend of mine who is an airline pilot got me some time on a Boeing 777 simulator at London Heathrow. At the end of the session I thought I would have a bit of fun and see what would happen if I crashed into one of the London buildings. With great ease on my first attempt I managed to fly straight into the Post Office Tower. After trashing the Houses of Parliament and Buckingham Palace I called it a day and went home. After that I had persistent nightmares about planes crashing into buildings and after 9/11 happened I did wonder if I had put my mind into some sort of time wormhole with my fun and games.

For me, my shift to a more open-minded person did begin with terror, but it was a terror born of temporary mental illness caused by trauma. Ultimately, it benefited me by compelling me to begin looking, for sheer sanity's sake at that point, toward things that I had thought were all ridiculous and impossible, like psi, DMILS, mediumship, and all the rest that we've talked about.

I'm a very evidence minded person, and even though I'm proud to say I'm no longer a blind dogmatic skeptic, imagine my surprise to discover that there was a mountain of reliable evidence supporting many of the aspects of human experience I had assumed to be delusion, fraud or wishful thinking! I was even more delighted to find that research and discover go on today into areas that many of us still assume to be garbage: survival, qi energy, distant healing, retrocausation, and so on.

What's even more thrilling is that new frontier views of quantum mechanics are starting to support the idea of a holistic cosmos based on consciousness. Am I 100% convinced of any of this? No. I don't think an honest person or a scientist can ever be 100% sure of anything. With that view comes dogmatism. But I do know that reality is clearly far, far more complex, multi-layered, interactive and marvelous than many mainstream thinkers will admit, even if they know it in their private moments. My own fear has brought me to this revelation and changed me for the better, and even if survival proves not to be true, I'm grateful for it.

For me, my shift to a more open-minded person did begin with terror, but it was a terror born of temporary mental illness caused by trauma. Ultimately, it benefited me by compelling me to begin looking, for sheer sanity's sake at that point, toward things that I had thought were all ridiculous and impossible, like psi, DMILS, mediumship, and all the rest that we've talked about.

I'm a very evidence minded person, and even though I'm proud to say I'm no longer a blind dogmatic skeptic, imagine my surprise to discover that there was a mountain of reliable evidence supporting many of the aspects of human experience I had assumed to be delusion, fraud or wishful thinking! I was even more delighted to find that research and discover go on today into areas that many of us still assume to be garbage: survival, qi energy, distant healing, retrocausation, and so on.

What's even more thrilling is that new frontier views of quantum mechanics are starting to support the idea of a holistic cosmos based on consciousness. Am I 100% convinced of any of this? No. I don't think an honest person or a scientist can ever be 100% sure of anything. With that view comes dogmatism. But I do know that reality is clearly far, far more complex, multi-layered, interactive and marvelous than many mainstream thinkers will admit, even if they know it in their private moments. My own fear has brought me to this revelation and changed me for the better, and even if survival proves not to be true, I'm grateful for it.

Well for me even as a child I would look up into the night sky and ask what is the meaning of life. Tried religion but the illogical beliefs almost turned me into a total confirmed atheist. But there was something inside of me I cannot explain it that revealed to me "there is more to this world than meets the eye".

After a significant emotional event in 1991 and yes fear big time a fear that I am now not afraid to admit to, I started my own search into the mysteries of life. By that time with a PhD in a science field I had some confidence in my ability to do research so I began with NDE’s, then theoretical quantum physics, enlightened Hindus, ACIM, etc.

My research approach was not to buy into any system of beliefs (religions) because my consulting clients had shown me that once we accept a system of beliefs (theirs was a push system and I taught the Toyota pull system) how extremely difficult it is to change our beliefs.

This research has been 16 years of frustrations, insights, discoveries, some mental pain, (fears and doubts) but now it is my passion. What can be more fruitful in our lives than to find our why we are here, if our lives have meaning, and if we survive death.

Now I have to say the evidence keeps pointing to a reality that highly suggests there is an unfoldment of consciousness in this universe and we humans are on a journey towards a reality we cannot even imagine.

Now many will state that I found the evidence for life after death because of my fears so wishful thinking took over, but when I started this search I expected to find that this world is it; period.

This material world is very convincing. It has some very smart people caught up in the illusion of this material world. Intellectuals such as Dawkins and Randi (well maybe not Randi) are unable to see pass their materialistic beliefs.


Just because some "paranormal" phenomena exist doesn't mean that the universe has any meaning. Take a look at Indian religions; they accept the existence of these phenomena but they all posit that the universe is completely meaningless. Also, none of them consider life after death to be a good thing.

I'm not saying anybody is right or wrong, but these phenomena don't invalidate all of the views of Dawkins, Blackmore, etc.

My search too, has been motivated by the fears discussed. In childhood I developed the fear of death and oblivion. And later, was deeply disturbed by the atheistic-scientific view of things in which the rich inner life of humans, and all of our joys and sufferings are seen as a novel accident, a glitch in the great machine which could wipe out all life in an instant.

So motivation number one, was a hope that this vision was not the final truth. I hoped for survival and searched for meaning. Motivation number two was not to be fooled. Under no circumstances did I want to falsify reality for the purposes of comfort, I did not want to succumb to magical thinking. After all, lying to oneself does not make the thing one wants to be true a fact.

There is too much ground to be covered, I cannot summarize 'my own journey' here. But one cannot help feeling that the quest is a big part of the 'answer'.The commitment to the process of learning and experiencing is – perhaps – how the we expand the bounds of the soul. There is a lot of remarkable material out there and I have been particularly inspired by the writings of Colin Wilson, Charles Tart, Stephen Braude, Michael Grosso, Herman Hesse, and many others. I think a new religious vision is crystallising, and the other night I found this remarkable article by a doctor of philosophy that points the way,

http://www.magicandreason.com/pdf/
TheNewReligiousConsciousness
-JosephFelser.pdf

(The url divided between two lines to display correctly).

To end, a quotation by John Hick:

'So, to conclude, my basic epistemological argument is that it is as rational for those who participate sufficiently in the religious response to the universe to adopt and try to live in terms of a religious conception of it, as it is for those who do not currently participate in that response to adopt a naturalistic interpretation of it. I would add however that we seem to have an inborn tendency to experience the natural in terms of the supra-natural. This tendency can be repressed or perverted, as in Soviet Russia, Maoist China, and Nazi Germany, and also in a quite different way in our own contemporary western secular culture. But we are ourselves part of the totality of reality, and it may well be that the religious aspect of our nature answers to the character of the totality. At any rate, I maintain that it is just as reasonable, just as rational, just as intellectually responsible, to take the risk of trusting the religious aspect of our nature as it is to take the opposite risk of suppressing it – which is not, needless to say, a risk of perdition, but of being blind, at least for now, to an enormously important and transforming range of reality.' (On Doing Philosophy of Religion, http://www.johnhick.org.uk/article3.html)

I think there is a fundamental mystery to existence . I find it hard to believe that the universe is overseen by a force that is benevolent and mindfull of living things . At the same time metaphysical naturalism seems destined to be forever incomplete .

Putting aside the mind/brain problem and the findings of parapsychology , what is the nature of matter itself ? What are these point particles ? Why do they exist ? How far down the explainitory chain can we go before we simply declare that matter , or whatever exotic precursor we theorize , is what it is because it is what it is ?

I believe that the universe may be a frothing mass of incoherence at root , but of all the surprises it may have in store I don't think an afterlife would be the most bizarre .

Neal, I'm in your camp when it comes to meaning. Where that seems to be the primary concern of many, it doesn't really bother me much. I don't think the cosmos can have meaning without an intelligence behind it, and I think the jury is very much out on that issue. I think we create the meaning in our lives. I do think that the vast evidence for the paranormal suggests that the mind is not dependent on the brain, which then leads to the possibility of survival, even though the evidence for that is not as strong.

I think Ryan's point is well taken: we know the universe to be filled with mysteries beyond reckoning, and it's the search that defines us. I think rather than being made credulous by a personal crisis, we're turned into seekers. As long as we maintain that refusal to be fooled, that is.

Neal from my point of view Dawkins and most hostile atheists cannot get past attacking religious views. Illogical religious beliefs should only be a starting point not the end all of our research

As James said something to the effect you only have to find one white crow to know the world is not made up of all black crows. I myself am amazed at the overwhelming amount of evidence for life after death. I find most atheists won’t even look at the evidence little lone do any serious research on it.

Go to the rational response teams chat room and ask them to read a book called "no living person could have known" or listen to the Leslie Flint tapes and see what kind of response you get. These people are not interested in rational thinking but maintaining at all costs their established beliefs. They are like the very people they attack the most: religious fundamentalists.

At this stage of our human development I suspect we have only touched the surface into the mysteries of life.

Hi Michael

I really like this text because it is exactly the position i hit on over the years.

In my opinion this is the point:

"And these days I'm not so worried about the prospect of personal extinction. While I'm inclined to think that the personality does continue after death, the issue doesn't seem as pressing to me as it once did. As long as there is a larger purpose to it all, I don't necessarily insist on the continuation of my little ego (though the egoic part of me would like that)."

What is life worth, what is any action worth, if anything is meaningless? What is the difference between war and peace, between good and evil?
It's like a mathematical formula and at the end you multiply with zero. I can't believe that everything i do is meaningless.

And sorry for my english, i am from germany and i try hard to write comprehendible ;)

Good points but I think it should be pointed out that "ordinary" science appeals to magical thinking all the time. You don't have to appeal to the "paranormal" for mysteries. I suggest reading David Berlinski piece on the "Origins of Being."

http://www.discovery.org/scripts/viewDB/index.php?command=view&id=616

His responses to the letters he received are also interesting:

http://www.commentarymagazine.com/cm/main/article.pdf?handle=com.commentarymagazine.content.Article::9348

I also recommend this article:

http://www.discovery.org/scripts/viewDB/index.php?command=view&id=131

Neal, what I find ironic are "mainstream" scientific ideas like the concept that cosmic strings are vibrating in an 11-dimensional universe and shaping the structure of the cosmos. If that's not magical thinking, what is?

Tim,

I definitely agree. That is why I like Berlinski's articles. He exposes the magical thinking that pervades scientific thinking as the scientific community tries to deny it.

For me, I don't find anything wishful or magical about life after death. Even without a shred of evidence, I would still suspect an afterlife because of the amazing phenomena of life (if sentient consciousness naturally occurs in the universe, then it's a fundamental part of the universe, so what is there to fear?)

But then there's the great archive of evidence pointing toward a different dimension that houses both our consciousness and yes, our personal identities, too. This is just icing on the cake for something which I feel is almost self evident.

There's no shame in having an interest in survival after death, it's not a weakness derived from wishful thinking at all, it's more like your logical mind attacking a rather illogical and pessimistic notion that we're just mistakes in the cosmic machine.

Carl Sagan once said we are the universe trying to understand itself. Do you think that the universe would have a system that systemetically annihilates its most beautiful aspect, self awareness/individuality? Come on. ;)

The comments to this entry are closed.