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Mike,
Thanks for having me.
I would only add that Dr. Stanley Krippner, an internationally known psychologist and parapsychologist read and endorsed The SHIVA Syndrome. He said:

"After a Russian mind-research project opens a black hole in a Moscow suburb, researcher Beau Walker is coerced into joining the ensuing investigation. He soon realizes that anomalies worldwide–including the loss of an American space shuttle and a bizarre personal experience–coincided with the Podol’sk singularity. As events escalate, Walker embarks on an epic journey to come to terms with his personal demons, even as he struggles to save humanity from itself.

In The SHIVA Syndrome, the author (a clinical psychologist) skillfully and ingeniously interweaves altered states of consciousness and parapsychology with genetics, paleontology, mythology, and religion to produce a frightening, brisk, and film-worthy story building to an intense climax. The story challenges conventional notions of reality, ultimately concluding that human consciousness extends well beyond the flesh–and offers enormous potential for both creation and destruction."

Stanley Krippner, Ph.D., co-author Personal Mythology, co-editor Varieties of Anomalous Experience: Examining the Scientific Evidence, Second Edition (August 2013).

Michael, I hope you don't mind me briefly changing topic, but I wanted to share some synchronicities with you given your interest in that area. More cases could be given.


1. Back in December I visited my friend Becca in Missouri. One day we went into a "cowboy store". While we were walking around in the clothing section I found a 20 dollar bill on the ground. I looked around but didn't see anybody looking for anything. So I held onto it, but I felt wrong about it and actually sincerely hoped I would bump into the person who lost it. 10 minutes later I had a sudden powerful urge (seriously) to look at steel toed boots (not regular boots). Well, in the steel toed aisle were two employees talking about a woman who lost a 20 dollar bill earlier in the day. So I gave them the 20 to give to her. The timing on that is strange enough, but here's the stranger part. Shortly after returning home to VA, I was at work when Becca popped into my thoughts. As I was thinking about her, a customer walked up to me with a 20 dollar bill in hand and said "somebody dropped this".....


2. Here's another case I had. Background: My name is Patrick, I have severe OCD, and at the time was struggling with major depression, which caused me to feel sad, lonely, and angry. One Thursday morning I woke up feeling unnaturally angry and lonely. It felt like I had been poisoned by something that was causing those feelings. It was more intense than usual. I was *so* lonely angry and *so* angry that people weren't reaching out to me. And the OCD had been bad that day as well. My brother decided to come over randomly, even after I told him not to. He knew I was "moody", but didn't have nay clue how severe it was. He decided to come over long after he discovered my moodiness. I don't know why he chose the specific time he did. Well, we both sat on the couch and turned the TV on. The first thing that came on was a show called "Anger Managment". The first scene that came on was a therapist talking to a patient named "Patrick". The therapist said, "Patrick, what's wrong? You seem pissed off." Patrick replied, "I'm feeling really lonely"!!! Later on in the same episode the therapist said, "today is Thursday". It gets more bizarre. The opening scene of the next episode (we kept watching back to back episodes on TV) involved the same therapist telling a patient to not cave into OCD rituals!!!


I thought you'd find these cases interesting. It really *seems* like some outside agency and/or some psi functioning was involved in orchestrating these cases. Thoughts?

- Pat

Thanks for your personal stories, Pat. I've had a number of these experiences myself.

I have no problems with OT comments, but I hope some people will share their thoughts on Alan Joshua's interview, since he put a lot of time into his answers to my questions.

I downloaded the book today. Paranormal based fiction that works with factual aspects of the subject instead of featuring "horny vampires and staggering zombies" (gotta love that phrase!) is hard to find. MP's Chasing Omega is one example, and I can't think of any more.

There are plenty of books out there that present a rational presentation of spirituality and the paranormal, but that can get dry after awhile. There's a limit to how many facts and how much speculation one can digest before a topic gets boring. Fiction can breathe fire into a subject, just ask any religion. Virtually every religion has myths which were never intended to be taken literally. These myths can relate multiple Truths with more punch in a way that straightforward edicts cannot. This is partly why I accept the biblical account of Jesus teaching in parables as a historical fact. Or as Albert Camus said, "Fiction is the lie through which we tell the truth."

I'm look forward to reading my copy of The Shiva Syndrome tonight. It's already looking good.

"Paranormal based fiction that works with factual aspects of the subject instead of featuring "horny vampires and staggering zombies" (gotta love that phrase!) is hard to find. MP's Chasing Omega is one example, and I can't think of any more."

I too really liked Chasing Omega. In this regard I would also recommend thoroughly Phil Rickman's books. Here's his Amazon page:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Phil-Rickman/e/B000APIPYI/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1428649320&sr=1-2-ent

I forgot to add that I have placed Alan Johsua's book on my Amazon wishlist! S

I know this is sacrilege, but I was rather disappointed with Chasing Omega. I felt as it if was a book written in two parts, by two different people. My feeling is that Michael should have written the second half more naturally, from himself, rather than trying to make it into an authority on the subject it covers. Even so, it was very readable. :)

What a solid, substantive set of replies! I'll comment further when I get out from under my work duties.

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