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The old quote from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle comes to mind here:

"Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth."

If the mother was indeed dead for so long, and there was no one else in the car, than the logical explanation is that something or someone non-material did somehow communicate with those officers.

It's fascinating to see this type of phenomena occur when lives are at risk during an accident (I've had one myself, where a sudden, forceful thought caused me to glance over, recognize, and just narrowly avoid getting in a car crash), but this seems more concrete if there were only one adult in the car, and she had been dead for some time. Plus, if more than one of the officers heard the voice, that's really strong evidence against it being a hallucination.

Interesting case, Michael! When Anderson Cooper asked one of the officers where he thought the voice was coming from, he said:

"For two nights I've laid awake trying to figure out exactly what it could be. . . . All I know is that it was there and we all heard it."

He said that the voice motivated them to work harder to rescue whoever was in the car. From what I gather, there was no chance that the mother was still alive.

This officer seems to be deeply affected -- the sort of reaction you might expect to see in somewhat whose worldview has just been tested.

Anthony Peake writes about this phenomena a lot his his book 'The Daemon: a guide to your secret extraordinary self'.

If this was an isolated incident, we could write it off as a peculiar story and then forget about it. However, these things happen a lot. I'm sure someone will post here with an account of a premonition or warning of impending danger.

Sometimes, it is a hunch, a premonition or intuition, at other times it is an actual voice, *telling* you to get off the road... now!

The next thing that happens, a building collapses on the road ahead, or a truck appears around the corner and skids right across where you would have been had you not pulled over.

What is this voice? the higher self, god, our spirit guide? Who knows.

I get the feeling that this may be an important case. Here are four pretty impressive, matter of fact guys. I saw their interview and they certainly don’t look like they would be “lying for Jesus” to me. More than one of them heard the voice. They acted upon it, they verified it with each other. They saved a life because of it. They voice was so clear that they spoke back, telling the car occupants to “hang on.” It is also pretty amazing that the voice spoke a full sentence. “Help me, were in here.”

I agree with Michael on this one. The mother had all of the reason in the world to try and save her daughter. It appears that she did.


GregL

I have seen several versions of this story. The early ones just said that the officers heard a cry for help but did not supply any quotes of what was heard. I think there is a big difference between a noise that sounded like 'help" and "help me, help me" as quoted in the linked article. An extraneous sound from a stressed vehicle might be interpreted as a one-syllable word 'help' but it would be difficult to interpret 'help me, help me' coming from the vehicle as anything other than a vocalization from an English-speaking human being( assuming there wasn't a parrot or Myna Bird in the car).

"What was the Sherlock Holmes principle? 'Once you have discounted the impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.'
I reject that entirely. The impossible often has a kind of integrity to it which the merely improbable lacks. How often have you been presented with an apparently rational explanation of something that works in all respects other than one, which is just that it is hopelessly improbable? Your instinct is to say 'Yes, but he or she simply wouldn't do that.'" -Dirk Gently

I find it much easier to believe the "impossible" explanation, that the mother's spirit stayed to call for help, than any of the dozens of hopelessly improbable explanations on tap from the materialist dead-enders.

Interesting story. I have to wonder at the people who aren't just adamant that there's no God or universal power or spirit-soul. It's one thing to be doubting or non-believing - and I confess that I often am - it's another to be almost hysterical about it. It makes me wonder if these kinds of people are afraid of something.

What a crazy story. Based on the responses, I'm continually amazed by how 'scared' some people are that they will be 'duped' into superstition. Not that it's wrong to speculate about potential causes, but sometimes a duck is just a duck and you have to keep the explanations within reason.

These kinds of stories are so common. I remember reading in some book about a fireman who was guided to safety by an angel in the smoke. She told him which way to get out. The smoke was so thick he couldn't figure out which way was out.

Cecil, a 73 year old friend at church, when he was a teenager was out in a field and a big thunderstorm came up. He took shelter out under a big tree in a field and he heard a voice say "Run Cecil Run!" He just crouched there under that tree and then he heard the voice say a little louder, "run cecil run!", the third time he heard the voice it was very insistent and it said loudly "RUN CECIL RUN!" so he took off running and when he got like 100 feet (yard?) away a big bolt of lightning struck the tree and split it in two. Cecil told me if he hadn't taken off running he'd have been killed.

I've read and heard about lot of other stories like these... A kid in the front seat of a car who was told by "someone" to crouch down in the floorboard of the front passenger seat where he was sitting. It was insistent so he did and when they went through an intersection they were broadsided and the car that hit them's front wheel came up to where he'd been sitting but because he had moved he wasn't killed.

"Here are four pretty impressive, matter of fact guys. I saw their interview and they certainly don’t look like they would be “lying for Jesus” to me. More than one of them heard the voice. They acted upon it, they verified it with each other. They saved a life because of it. They voice was so clear that they spoke back, telling the car occupants to “hang on.” It is also pretty amazing that the voice spoke a full sentence. “Help me, were in here.”

Nice summing up of the key facts, GregL!

"they certainly don’t look like they would be “lying for Jesus” to me."

As I've said, the officer who lay awake for two nights trying to figure out what happened seems almost troubled by the experience, as if it were forcing him to re-consider some long-held beliefs. (Though I may be reading too much into a brief interview.)

This story seems to be getting better and better as it goes along. At first the sound was "help", and then it was "help me, help me" and now, "help me, we're in here". What were the actual words which were heard? What did the officers say they heard? - AOD

Supposedly one of the policemen was wearing a body camera--that could settle the matter once and for all, if the tape is released (however *if* the voice was indeed telepathically communicated, that may or may not be something the camera microphone would pick up on). Though I suspect even if a voice is clearly audible on the recording, the debunkers will still find a way of explaining it away.

On a somewhat related note: this morning I was reading these two stories of possible disembodied beings--the first about the mysterious "presence" felt by the Shackleton team on their trek across Antarctica:

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/mar/05/the-strange-world-of-felt-presences

--which prompted me to go back and look at the story of the those phantom presences Lindbergh sensed on his epic fight across the Atlantic:

http://unmyst3.blogspot.com/2011/03/charles-lindbergh.html

Good stuff.

AOD said:

"and now, "help me, we're in here". What were the actual words which were heard? What did the officers say they heard? - AOD"

Actually, I've now read or watched at least 5 or 6 versions of this story, and haven't come across the "we're in here" part. Maybe someone else has?

The officers heard "Help me." I saw this on an interview which I can't seem to find at the moment. In addition this :

Johnson said the police don't believe the voice came from Groesbeck.

"Due to the trauma she sustained, we suspect she was deceased upon impact. I don’t believe she survived the impact of the car crash. There was massive trauma," Johnson said.

"The baby was in a car seat in the backseat on the passenger side," Lt. Cory Slaymaker of the Spanish Fork Police Department had said. "The vehicle was on its top, so the car seat could have been out of the water. The car was on the embankment, so I don't know how much water was getting into the car."

He said the water was so cold that the rescue crew members could only stay in for short periods of time.
.......................
It's pointless bothering what the sceptics think. These things happen all the time.

What did the officers say they heard? - AOD

"We could see a person in the front seat and then we heard a voice saying, ‘Help me, we’re in here.’ It was clear as day,” said Officer Tyler Beddoes of the Spanish Fork Police" - Officer Tyler Beddoes as quoted in the NYC Daily News

I still think that this is an important case, and is more compelling than most "voice" experiences as it was heard by several different people, all professional rescue or police. This pretty much eliminates hallucination as the culprit.

Bruce, thanks for the compliment.

GregL

Interesting case. Thanks for mentioning, and not surprised the materialist evangelicals rushed in to employ their shaming tactics.

"‘Help me, we’re in here.’ It was clear as day,”. . . . Officer Tyler Beddoes as quoted in the NYC Daily News"

Thanks for clarifying your source on that, Greg. The case gets stronger. Quite remarkable.

Hi, Michael.
What about a telepathic contact among the baby and her rescuers?
Best regards.

For some reason, this also reminded me of another thing - people who get heart transplants and then suddenly pick up the hobbies of the deceased person who donated the heart. How many made-for-TV-movies have been about this, LOL? It's not an Afterlife experience (or maybe it is?). But it reminds me of what Seth seemed to say, that our spirit or being is in all of our cells. I'm also one of those people who get reminded in daily living of what Seth said, at odd moments.

"This pretty much eliminates hallucination as the culprit."

One "explanation" the scoffers probably haven't come up with is that maybe one of the cops was a ventriloquist. Or have they?

Well, yes this is a tantalizing case. It reminds me of the story of Claude and his wife who were in an accident on Interstate 55 in which Claude's wife was decapitated. When the rescue squad arrived on the scene they of course had to pick up the remains and when they picked up the decapitated head of Claude's wife, they heard her say, "Oh Claude!" Now I don't know if that is a true story or not but it made the rounds when I was in high school and started me to get interested in the paranormal. Since then I have spent much of my life considering these kinds of stories. Most or all of them are not evidential as I believe that the 'Water Baby' case is not evidential ---interesting but not yet evidential. Frederic W.H. Myers in his book, Human Personality and It's Survival of Bodily Death provides many examples of such cases, suggesting the paranormal but not evidential. They make for good ghost stories around a camp fire if one has the 'will to believe'.

So far all of what is reported in the 'Water Baby' case is second or third-hand information from some unnamed person present at the scene and then reported on the internet or in newspapers as quoted facts. Anyone who has done any writing at all knows that it is too tempting to play loose with quotation marks and often one uses them to indicate the gist or intent of what was said, a paraphrase of what was meant but not the actual words. This is especially easy to do when one is quoting something given orally as it is sometimes difficult to take down the words verbatim during an interview especially during trying circumstances as one might find at an accident scene in cold weather. Few reporters can rely on memory to provide verifiable quotations. In this case it is important to know the actual words that were said as obviously the more words heard the more likely one might think they were direct voice phenomena from the spirit world.

I believe that I heard my deceased father call my name early one morning the day before my mother died but on reflection---over time, perhaps I just heard some noise in the house as I was awakening from sleep which my brain interpreted as my name being called. Who knows! It did sound like my father though as he had a very agitated way of calling my name.

Personally I would like to hear an audio or video of an interview with the police officers or a transcript of the words they actually used in describing what they heard. If anyone has a link to an actual interview with the officers I would appreciate it. For me, that would provide first-hand information.

I think that one has to guard against a 'will to believe' in reports such as this. In reading the comments about the report I get a sinking feeling in my stomach, wondering if this is how many, if not all, reports of the paranormal develop, growing from some small seed of information into a full-blown fragrant rose of the paranormal as it is lovingly tended by the gardeners. My doubts regarding all things paranormal sadly grow along with that thorny rose of fabrication and the fragrance does not smell sweet! - AOD

It would seemingly be useful to cross-reference all the info from this case, because it simply isn't 'nailed down' at this point. What was said - seemingly the simplest part of this case - is still wildly in doubt (was it "help", "help me", or "help me we're in here"). People have brought up the odd point that "help me" should be "help us" since there were two people in there. And why was it necessary to say "help" in the first place, clearly the people arriving *were* coming to help. Also, this is a new aspect to me: "We could see a person in the front seat and then we heard a voice saying, ‘Help me, we’re in here.’ It was clear as day,” So they were close enough to see someone, and then heard the words - that's pretty close. And lastly, I've read the mother was "dead on impact", "dead for hours" and a half dozen other variations. Has the coroner verified that? If it was a human voice (not spirit) then it was the mother, and perhaps the rescuers inadvertently killed her when they subsequently flipped the car over. I hope this story has legs, it is fascinating.

Interesting case, doesn't surprise me at all.

Ray G, read both of the links you shared. Thank you!

A number of years ago I remember coming home from a meeting in Knoxville with my wife. It was about a 45 minute drive from our house to town. We lived out in the country.

After we got home I was standing at the kitchen sink washing dishes, sort of looking out the window over the sink, zoning out not really thinking about anything, when voice "popped" into my head and said "Bonnie's going to come in here and say "thanks for going with me." Now what was strange was it was a "not me" voice and so powerful that I knew that it was going to come true. It was like a "whoa!" moment.

So what was interesting was it gave me a few seconds to think about how to respond when it happened. So about half a minute later my wife walked into the kitchen and said "thanks for going with me." I just replied "you're welcome" and just smiled to myself.

It is not like I hear voices all the time. It only happened that one time and it has never happened again.

It solidified my belief in fate and predestination, like I knew that everything was preplanned and we were are just living out the life that has been planned for us, in much the same way students learn from the lesson plans prepared by their teachers.

A good teacher makes detailed lesson plans and at the top of it she writes a clearly stated objective stating what the student is supposed to learn from that lesson.

@Art: The experience you recount reminds me of the time a delivery man rang to check the exact whereabouts of my home (a fairly common occurance as the sat nav directions are incorrect). As I replaced the receiver it suddenly occurred to me that the man was going to ask to use the loo . . . . . . . . . and he did! As with your encounter, it was one of those trivial certainties that leave one smiling.

"Anyone who has done any writing at all knows that it is too tempting to play loose with quotation marks and often one uses them to indicate the gist or intent of what was said, a paraphrase of what was meant but not the actual words."
--AOD

What's needed is an informal agreement among usage pundits on a punctuation mark to indicate a paraphrase or an inexactly remembered quotation. I've been using the circumflex ^ because it's on the normal keyboard, is not used for much else, and because its look seems suggestive of what its intended meaning is.

With more people (including reporters) having mobile devices that have the ability--sometimes only with the proper app installed--to act as Digital Voice Recorders, we should be getting more verified quotations going forward.

I still remember when I was a kid being in the woods hearing someone asking for help. Scared to death I searched the area and finally realized it was the sound of a tree rubbing up against another one. Pareidolia is not just a visual phenomena, it is also audio. My guess is that jacked up on adrenaline, these four guys heard something that sounded like a cry for help. They all turned to each other with the classic "Did you hear that" compared notes and came to the conclusion that it was a voice. That is probably why if you listen to the interviews, they do not all say they heard the exact same thing. Just a theory, the true heart of this story is that they are heroes saving a life and that the child is now without her mother.

"Help me, we are in here." On reflection if this is indeed what was said it is a very interesting statement.
'Help me' - is the most accurate statement.
'Help us' - would be inaccurate for the mother had passed on and her body was beyond help.
'We are in here' - is perfectly accurate.
So the statement as a whole could not have been more appropriate or succinct. It doesn't help as to the spirit of the mother or some guardian spirit but it is interesting nonetheless.

Amos Oliver Doyle, does your growing doubt in the paranormal mean you are becoming a materialist?

Fyi, some 18 month olds can speak in short sentences, so it's not out of the question that the living girl called out for help. Why are we dismissing that?

The skeptics come up with a compelling explanation for the mysterious voice!

Article says:
"it’s possible that in the chaos of the recovery effort some unrelated sound nearby — maybe the river waters itself, or from cars nearby — was mistaken for a cry for help".

http://news.discovery.com/human/psychology/mysterious-voice-heard-from-accident-150312.htm

||I get a sinking feeling in my stomach, wondering if this is how many, if not all, reports of the paranormal develop, growing from some small seed of information into a full-blown fragrant rose of the paranormal as it is lovingly tended by the gardeners. My doubts regarding all things paranormal sadly grow along with that thorny rose of fabrication and the fragrance does not smell sweet! - AOD ||

Sounds like good old Kai - the only difference is his certainty.

Luis asked: "Amos Oliver Doyle, does your growing doubt in the paranormal mean you are becoming a materialist?"

Not at all, Luis. I think that there are a lot of reports suggesting either some faculty of humans that is not known yet or that there may be some other reality with which one may come in contact under the right circumstances.

I hesitate to apply labels to myself as quite frankly I just don't know what the truth is in these so-called paranormal reports. I have been around long enough not to trust that everything spoken by a human being is 'the god's honest truth'---not that they are necessarily fabrications but that they are all filtered though the mind of man which may be mistaken in its interpretations. I like to think that I am open to all possibilities however.

Like Wordsworth, I think that these paranormal accounts may be 'Intimations of Immortality' but I am not totally convinced. Only after considering a wide range of 'evidence' from many different sources e.g., NDE reports, trance mediums e.g. Leonora Piper, non-trance mediums e.g. Christopher Stillar, organ transplant cases, reincarnation stories e.g., Ian Stevenson, automatic writing e.g. Chico Xavier, and anecdotal reports of apparitions and direct voice phenomena do I tend to believe that the odds are that some of them probably are what they seem to be.

In my opinion, the best tangible evidence of survival of human consciousness or human supernormal abilities is to be found in the varied anachronistic writings of Patience Worth. Not that I think that Patience Worth was a spirit floating around somewhere but that there is strong suggestion in this case that Pearl Curran was not writing this material attributed to Patience Worth out of her conscious or sub conscious mind. The evidential writing is there for anyone to review, research and interpret. It is not second or third-hand information; it is hard evidence, direct from the source, whatever that may be. Perhaps Patience Worth was a disembodied spirit or maybe Pearl Curran was the reincarnation of other women including someone named Patience Worth, or as suggested by a friend of mine, perhaps Patience Worth was a group of spirits somewhat like the Imperator Group of Leonora Piper. Whatever she was or is, the evidence she left behind is available for anyone to consider directly.

Am I a materialist? Nay, not when that which I consider my very being is non-material. - AOD


p said: "Fyi, some 18 month olds can speak in short sentences, so it's not out of the question that the living girl called out for help. Why are we dismissing that?"

Of course, that should be considered. I have never raised an infant so I don't know at what age they speak or how they go about it but I know they cry and call out for mommy or daddy. I myself while still taking the bottle and in my crib remember screaming for mommy and throwing my bottle against the wall breaking it. I probably was older than 18 months but still it is likely that 18-month olds can call out for attention when they feel the need. This should be easy to check out. Can the child speak a few words? If so and the child was conscious when found, then probably this is the most likely source of the cry for help. - AOD

The link provided by Ian Wardell is very thought provoking! I especially noted the comment made by one of the officers which I think is more congruent with other paranormal voice communications. The officer reportedly said,

“It felt like I could hear someone telling me, ‘I need help,” [officer Bryan] DeWitt told CNN affiliate KSL. ‘It was very surreal, something that I felt like I could hear.’”

His experience of feeling the voice is consistent with many other reports where people don't actually hear a voice out loud but they clearly hear a voice speaking to them in their head---a voice which is not their own. (This is how Pearl Curran received communications from Patience Worth. Leonora Piper also received communications this way.)

This officer's account does more than any others to convince me that something paranormal was really going on in this case. - AOD

Anderson Cooper has an interesting interview with the four officers involved. Apparently the “voice” did say “Help us, help us inside….”

http://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2015/03/10/ac-rescuers-found-baby-alive.cnn

The officers did respond verbally to the voice. Hard to say that this was the baby or the living mother speaking. Mom was dead and the baby was apparently unconscious. Who knows? Everybody seems to bend over backwards trying to fit this incident into their own belief system. Fascinating.

GregL

@AOD: 18 month old babies don't normally voice their concerns when traumatized. Rather, they cry. If angry they might well shout but in the kind of desperately traumatic circumstances under discussion here the most one could expect from a child of that age is crying. That aside, I believe the officers concerned stated that the child was unconscious when rescued. Moreover, there is a very great difference between the sound of a baby's voice and that of an adult; a very clearly recognizable difference.

Arugh! Thanks GregL.

One of the four officers, Officer Beddoes, said that he heard "help us, help us" inside the car but continued later to say that he assumed that it (the voice) was in the car but wasn't sure. Anderson Cooper changed the words to "help me". Then later on Beddoes changed it to "help me" also. One other officer, Officer Warner, agreed that he heard something too but didn't say what he heard. After the four officers got together later, Officer Beddoes said that they all agreed that they had heard something. "It was there. We all heard it" said Beddoes.

One of the four officers was silent during the interview but others seemed to nod their head in agreement at some points in the interview. A third officer, Officer Tomadakis thought that the child was "not breathing but had some life in her" and that he could see her eyes moving when removed from the car and in response to Cooper's implied question that "she wasn't conscious, she wasn't crying or anything like that", the officer was in agreement. Beddoes said that they later learned that the mother was deceased at that time.

It would have been informative to have heard the unedited interview. After hearing this edited interview by Anderson Cooper, I believe there is nothing in this story that would convince me that anything paranormal was involved---there may have been but there is no good evidence. - AOD

The baby was hypothermic and passed out. That is pretty clear from the video shown on the CNN site of the rescue itself. So I think it is reasonable to say that it was not the baby speaking. And the mother had pretty clearly been dead for hours.

Also, at the end of the video :http://www.cnn.com/2015/03/14/us/utah-baby-submerged-car/index.html we can hear the baby with her father and she is still at the babbling stage; not speaking anything like clear English.

AOD, none of the details you gave reduce the likelihood of a paranormal interpretation. I believe the proper attitude at this point is a *should-shrugging* "I don't know".

- P

oops. meant "SHOULDER-shrugging"

I have to let this thing go, but really now, take a look at what the AP is reporting.

http://www.aol.com/article/2015/03/09/how-toddler-survived-14-hours-in-a-car-that-plunged-into-river/21151145/?icid=maing-grid7%7Caol20-os%7Cdl6%7Csec3_lnk4%26pLid%3D627964

So---the voice is now an undeniable woman's voice softly asking for help which all four officers flat-out heard. They have no doubt! Officer Beddoes proclaims it a miracle saying that after they discussed it "we (the officers) all heard the same type of thing." "We just can't grasp what we were hearing."

Well, no and neither can I !

(For those of you who might think I am a materialist , be it known that RationalWiki has labeled me a "devout spiritualist" so I suppose that settles it.) - AOD

Thank you, Michael, for saying the obvious. The mother's consciousness/spirit lingered to summon help for her child. The intensity of the emotions surrounding the desire to protect a child helped make it possible for the soul-energy to reach across dimensions and be audible to the police officers.

AOD wrote, "... take a look at what the AP is reporting."

I looked at the AP report (which is dated March 9, so it's not new), but I couldn't see anything in it that changes the known facts. Do you mean that when the cops discussed it, they could have talked themselves into believing something that didn't happen? It's possible, but the mere fact that they discussed it among themselves isn't suspicious; who wouldn't discuss such a thing? It would be more suspicious if they hadn't talked it over.

Anyway, I agree that a story like this can never be airtight, but how many things in life - especially pertaining to human behavior - are airtight?

My oh my! I agree Michael, this is not an airtight story.- AOD

I have had a group of similar experiences. They are not as anomalous and difficult-to-explain as the Utah story, but are worthy of note.

They are all the same.

They go like this:

I am going to oversleep and be late for an important commitment.

When it is almost too late to be on time, a loud, sharp voice says "Jay!" (my name), which startles me out of my slumber.

The voice doesn't feel like me talking.

It's not like when you know you have to get up, so you somehow find a way to climb out of your dreamworld to get up on time.

These episodes feel more like having a pail of cold water thrown on me.

I know a skeptic would say the voice is simply my subconscious time sense acting on my behalf.

Yes, it could be that.

The reason I especially note these experiences is because they occur rarely, feel startling and rather weird, and feel like something else is doing the talking.

For what they're worth.

Apropos of nothing (but worth passing along anyway): There was a very interesting segment on TV this morning about (yet another) kid with memories of a past life, which seem to be corroborated by facts later unearthed which he couldn't have known. (Six minutes long)

http://www.today.com/news/return-life-how-some-children-have-memories-reincarnation-2D80550946

The guy behind the fact gathering regarding this boy's claims is Jim Tucker, M.D. Tucker is great. He took over Ian Stevenson's work. Tucker is not as staid and conservative in his approach to tracking down and sharing details about his reincarnation investigations as Stevenson was. He is more willing to share his observations with the media.

Ray said:

"There was a very interesting segment on TV this morning about (yet another) kid with memories of a past life"

Thanks, Ray! I love these stories. There are so many good ones, and they are so resistant to conventional explanations. This one definitely qualifies -- Tucker is no fool. (Though my own favorite expert on kids' past lives is Carol Bowman.)

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