IMG_0569
Blog powered by Typepad

« A 1907 NDE | Main | Shadowlands »

Comments

I read the book but never saw the film. I found it to be a good possible representation of the afterlife. The bureaucratic nature turns some off, but understand that not all afterlives are the same... which seems to be s point possibly missed even by inhabitants of these realms, who may have a singular vision of the next world based on their own experiences. The way I see it, some who transition need a physical world with rules and economics; while others are more comfortable becoming little white faery lights bouncing around in some fractal environment. There are many varying types of planes based on preference. The book explores even more details about life in the astral.

\\"When I was a small child, I was fascinated by Disneyland and Disney World, not so much because of the rides and attractions, but because they represented a perfectly manicured, clean, beautiful environment." - Michael Prescott//

Interesting you say that. When I was about 11 years old we lived in an apartment in Garden Grove, California with my mom. We really poor, no car, no phone, no TV, no air conditioning. Garden Grove is only about 3 miles from Anaheim, California and Disneyland. This was back in the mid 1960's. I knew Disneyland was there but had never been.

One time my dad came to visit and he took us all to Disneyland. I remember walking in down "Main Street" which seemed perfect to me. It was so bright and cheerful and beautiful that I had this overwhelming feeling of euphoria and happiness. I felt like I had died and gone to heaven. For me Disneyland was like heaven on Earth or like a little piece of heaven had broken off and fell to Earth and landed in Anaheim, California.

The next time I went to Disney World in Orlando with my then new wife. I guess I was in my early 20's? I was expecting that same good feeling, the euphoria, the overwhelming ecstatic feeling, but it wasn't there? It was strange but it was like being an adult had robbed me of that feeling? I mourned its loss.

Interesting review!

I think the bureaucracy is real but not so limiting. I am often asked during dreamtime to help those crossing over. Often they are Japanese. I just end up leading a group to the Other Side, and there is a point beyond which I cannot pass. (For whatever reason. I have entered the Afterlife during dreams many, many times, but during these guiding sessions, I end up not going further.) There is definitely an organization in place to help people cross over and adjust!

I don't recall which book about NDEs where I read it, but apparently Indians' NDEs have a lot of bureaucracy in them. The author theorized that this reflected the situation in India, where supposedly citizens have to navigate through quite a substantial bureaucracy throughout their lives. This again implies that one's life experiences influence the character of the NDE. I'm by no means an expert on India, but I've read that starting a business in India, for instance, requires more paperwork than in the U.S. I wonder if NDEs don't reflect one's life experiences, but rather, are deliberately tailored so that the person feels most comfortable or at home.

The movie itself sounds interesting, but I find myself agreeing with you, Michael, that the beureacratic elements seem rather dreary. But for me, I find them flat-out disturbing. According to what I've read of Mr. Xavier's teachings, we work, struggle, and suffer all our lives to make ends meet, accomplish our dreams, and after finally passing over and entering the gates of paradise, we're greeted and told, "Get to work!" Xavier makes the spiritual world like corporate America: You have to do whatever you're told, you have no free will, and you're always being ordered about with no possibility of doing your own thing.

I find Xavier's version of the afterlife to be one of the most hellish non-hell accounts I've ever read (if that makes sense). If we had that much bureaucratic red tape applied to the entire world, it'd result in something George Orwell couldn't fathom in his darkest nightmares. Yes, it may be governed by heavenly benevolence, but dictatorship is dictatorship, no matter what coat of paint you put on it. One paragraph I read that really upset me had a soul asking her supervisor if she could take some time off to go watch her family on earth, and was denied because she hadn't "earned" the right to do so, and had to keep working. I had the uncomfortable feeling that such a scene wouldn't be out of place in a civil war plantation with a psychologically vicious master relishing his torment of a slave.

I think the biggest problem in Xavier's teachings is that, essentially, we don't get any respite at all in either physical or spiritual existence. Other accounts do talk of working and helping others, but while these accounts have layers and varying degrees of spiritual advancement and seniority, a common thread is that this system goes at a do-it-at-your-own-pace, where your progress is measured only by how fast you want to work at learning and growth. Advanced spirits advise and guide instead of controlling those beneath them and enforce rules with an iron fist (of heavenly benevolence). Nothing else I've read implies or states that you have to earn the right to have a house or enjoy leisure activities; those are things that we do because we still identify as human, but drop away eventually as we fully accumulate to our true spiritual existence. I'm hoping that Xavier's teachings are wrong, or, at the least, may only apply to people of a certain mindset, as others have suggested.

On a more humorous note, If Xavier's accounts are true, I wonder if political proponents of smaller governments have apocalyptic-sized hissy-fits on arrival and learn about all the ministries they have to obey.

Yes, I remember reading about Indian NDEs in which they are told by the beings managing the process that a clerical error had been made and they have to go back.

This might be a way to get someone to go back who would be reluctant otherwise by using a simple metaphor.

When I am asked to help guide people to the other side, often the same type of metaphors are used to help get people to go *onward*.

(By the way, I have *modal* belief in these occurrences I am describing. They certainly seem like a different type of "dream," and I can see no other reason why I'd have reoccurring dreams of leading people, especially Japanese people, in large groups. But they are arguably "just dreams." So much can be thus described when dealing with the Afterlife, including meeting deceased people in our dreams and even NDEs [which would be demeaning to those who insist they are real, but of course skeptics would so demean them]. In any case, they seem to fit the overall belief system, so I'm going with it for now.)

I am often leading Japanese people on a train or to a train station. This would be a situation that a large percentage of Japanese people would understand. Typically, we end up having to go through a narrow area where the people I am guiding are able to pass but I am not. It's as if the hallway shrinks down to a tiny hole I can't get through.

Why use me and people like me in dreams? People who are still in the physical but have experience touching the other side (through dreams, mediumship, etc.) can serve as a bridge. If they are still lightly stuck in the physical, they can see me. In the dream, I can see them. Then they can follow me not so much in a physical sense but in a vibrational sense as I lead them up to the gateway of the Afterlife.

I think I first guided Japanese people after the tsunami in 2011. It seems I had some very big groups in dreams, and I was probably recruited because they needed all the helpers they could get. Perhaps I proved effective and they continue to use me from time to time. Perhaps a "foreigner" suddenly appearing who can speak Japanese (even though, as in all dreams, it's telepathic, and usually nothing much is said at all) helps "wake" people up a bit and get them going.

I am never really asked before I start doing the help. The dream just starts. They are never bad or unpleasant dreams. The people also seem OK, perhaps a bit quiet. I can't recall anyone ever asking me a question about what is going on. I think they only need a very slight amount of help to get the ball rolling, so to speak.

So that's my experience in greater detail!

I don't think they're deliberately tailored. I think what we see is cultural crossover. A highly organized mind requires bureaucracy as a way to ensure order. This may be more common in India than in other places. The thing is, I can totally relate. Sometimes systems and hierarchies ensures everything just makes more sense. Maybe if there was no bureaucracy in some of these planes, it would be completely helter skelter given the types of minds who inhabit it.

Chico Xavier was a fraud, his book "Nosso Lar/Astral City" is a copy - plagiarism - of "The Life Beyond the Veil", by Owen. Many other of his books are copies. You can see an article (in Portuguese) about "Nosso Lar" revealing the plagiarism here:

http://obraspsicografadas.org/2011/a-verdadeira-identidade-de-andr-luiz-finalmente-revelada/

And "Andre Luiz" never existed.

There may be as many astral environments as people in the world and souls in the afterlife :)

The way I understood the accusation of ‘suicide’ of Dr. Luiz when I read the book was not because he was ill, but because he wasted his life by heavy drinking and womanizing. In the book there was also a reference to abortions, which Dr. Luiz practice in some of her patients, and this also was taken into consideration to bolster the accusation of suicide.

I have no idea whether Chico Xavier was a fraud or not, but for me it doesn't really matter, since the information itself rings true--whatever the source. From my readings of NDEs (not so mention some 40 years of study with various yogis and shamans), my sense is that the movie probably comes closer to depicting what really happens after death than any other film out there --in a nutshell, we keep on learning, there are certain restrictions and "rules" just as there are here, there are teachers and students, etc.

By the way, I can't quite agree that the film shows suicide being "punished." As the film makes clear later on during the sequence when he starts feeling jealous towards his wife and new lover, and he suddenly finds himself transported back into the nether regions, you realize that his "hell" is entirely self-created, simply a reflection of inner discord, not some punishment imposed from without (which is something I found profoundly disturbing about "What Dreams May Come"). That's one of several subtle points in the movie I particularly liked. (Another one is when the angelic "helper" is rescuing him from the darkness, and compassionately reaches his hand out to the other beings down there, who simply recoil in response. In most conventional Hollywood films, that would have set the stage for some martial arts sequence, or magical lightning-bolts-from-the-fingers duel between the opponents!)

All in all, I found the movie quite well-done, and inspiring in its emphasis on compassion.

You can rent ($4) or buy ($10) this movie on Amazon here:
http://www.amazon.com/Astral-City-Spiritual-Journey-Subtitled/dp/B007UK0ETU/ref=sr_1_1?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1423854324&sr=1-1&keywords=Astral+City

Maybe the bureaucracy is symbolic of something else? The inability to enter Heaven? It's equivalent to western NDEs when they say they were met by someone who said to them, "it's not your time and you have to go back." Isn't that what bureaucracy does? It prevents you from achieving your goals.

Bureaucracy is like the river or bridge or fence that one must cross in order to enter heaven? People come back and use the language we have to try and describe the ineffable, that which can not be described with words so their mind makes a picture of something they are familiar with.

I have read literally thousands of NDEs. I remember reading one NDE of a little 11 year old girl who said that she was talking to a being of light and they were standing next to a fence and when the being of light told her that she had to go back she said she grabbed ahold of that fence and pitched a fit but the being of light just laughed and she woke up back in her body.

Fences, rivers, bridges, or bureaucracy it is all the same thing - that which prevents us from entering the Light, the place where our thoughts become things, where we control what we experience by the way we think.

from A.J. Ayer's NDE description,
"“Did you know that I was dead? The first time that I tried to cross the river I was frustrated, but my second attempt succeeded. It was most extraordinary. My thoughts became persons.”
http://www.philosopher.eu/others-writings/a-j-ayer-what-i-saw-when-i-was-dead/

from Mark H's NDE description,
"Suddenly I thought of a mountain, I had seen as a child. When I looked up from the road there it was; The Mountain! Not just the mountain! But the most breathtaking mountain I had ever seen! Details the likes of which no one could imagine. Colors shades of color, shadows for which there are no words in the human language to describe it."
http://www.nderf.org/NDERF/NDE_Experiences/mark_h%27s_nde.htm

I think that in Osis and Haraldsson's 1997 book "At the Hour of Death" there were near death reports of Indian bureaucracies. - AOD

Art, I see bureaucracy in this world as something we all find irritating, but necessary. Like fences and guard rails, so perhaps you're on to it. In my own NDE - again, not really sure about the whole thing - there was a low stone wall about a foot high that I could have easily stepped over, but couldn't for some reason.

Michael, I wrote this earlier today but suspect that I may not have posted it.

------------------------

"There may be as many astral environments as people in the world and souls in the afterlife."

Great point, Luciano.

Environment is a funny word . The implication is that we're talking about something *external* to us. But my sense is that reality is actually an inside job. Though it may be hard to fathom, we carry our environment with us wherever we go.

It's hard to explain, but each of my journeys began with an absolutely compelling sense of my internal world coming alive. After spending all my life focused on externals, I was suddenly transported to where the real action was taking place -- within.

And I understood (though it makes no sense to the logical mind) that that inner universe encompasses what I normally think of as the outer one, rather than vice-versa.

A word that is oftentimes used to describe NDEs is "ineffable" which means "that which can not be described".

Perhaps after we get back our mind makes pictures out of the ineffable qualities of heaven, like describing a light which has "personhood" qualities like love and acceptance and comfort as being "Jesus" or an Angel or God?

We put a name and a face to something that in this dimension or reality has no words that can describe it. So a person that says "it's not your time and you have to go back" becomes a bureaucrat or official that puts the kibosh on staying.

It's just different words that describe pretty much the same idea or thing. We struggle here to describe a place where time and space do not exist and where there is no separation and an overwhelming feeling of oneness and connectedness. A place where our thoughts become things and the way you think affects what reality you experience. Perhaps the physics of heaven is so different in kind that we don't even have the words to describe it?

View the movie on Hulu here for free: http://www.hulu.com/watch/364775

"Maybe the bureaucracy is symbolic of something else?"

It's also a system that appeals to the fundamentalist mindset (a very common mindset). During his career in the US Military, M. Scott Peck, being a psychiatrist interested in promoting greater psychological health, tried to make the working environment more healthy be allowing people down the line of command the right to their own area of power/influence in the decision-making process. He believed that everyone would be happier with fewer constraints and more mental freedom.

Guess what? It didn't work. The people beneath him in authority became insecure and unable to function with confidence. They wanted strict rules and no ambiguity. Perhaps life, for some, is more comfortable that way?

"As the film makes clear later on during the sequence when he starts feeling jealous towards his wife and new lover, and he suddenly finds himself transported back into the nether regions, you realize that his "hell" is entirely self-created, simply a reflection of inner discord, not some punishment imposed from without (which is something I found profoundly disturbing about "What Dreams May Come")."

Confused, because I was certain that Williams' wife in that latter movie was indeed in a hell of her own creation, as Williams' spirit guide (played by Max von Sydow) made perfectly clear at several junctures. Wikipedia concurs.

Here's a review of Guy Lyon Playfair's book about Chico Xavier:

http://www.nthposition.com/chicoxavier.php

The SPR pointed me to this review via Facebook.

BTW, Playfair's book is available on Amazon for only ... $1200?!

Hmm. I don't think I'll be paying that price.

My guess about why suicide is "bad" goes back to the information-as-fundamental theory* that Michael and I espouse (in perhaps different forms, though perhaps quite close).

If you seek to eliminate yourself and annihilate your own consciousness out of self-hate or other negative reason, you will enter the Afterlife with those intentions and have to process them. That's your "information content" at the time of death. Thus, although you live on, you are *about* trying not to live on--a very conflicted situation indeed.

Karma exists but is not about "punishment." One wise thing I heard about the fates of Nazi leaders (I believe it was Bruce Moen of afterlifeknowledge.com) was that they would want to go to a place where they could keep doing what they had been doing. So Hitler et al. would go to a place of hate. Unfortunately, he would find himself surrounded by a lot of hateful people with no power to inflict his will on them. Once he released his hate, he could go elsewhere.

Same thing about suicide. There is a lot of self-hate, etc., to work out there. It is very difficult to work out in that it is inward-turning, but I have seen no particular evidence that it's eternal or anything like that.

*Actually, I believe information is fundamental to a posteriori Reality, not the more fundamental a priori Reality.

Do people kill themselves out of 'self-hate, etc.'?

John--I suspect you're right about that. Perhaps what I am remembering is the finality and permanence with which "What Dreams May Come" depicted the hell Williams' wife was experiencing (initially, that is--before Williams' herculean effort to rescue her). I watched the film originally with someone whose sister had committed suicide, and recall how that one point became a topic of conversation between us for hours afterwards, since neither of us believed that suicide led to such long-term (let alone eternal) consequences. But I will check the movie out again sometime, and see how it handled that point.

Julie,

||Do people kill themselves out of 'self-hate, etc.'?||

Self-hate is a huge part of depression, a major if not the biggest cause of suicide.

Yes, Matt, I agree: "One wise thing I heard about the fates of Nazi leaders (I believe it was Bruce Moen of afterlifeknowledge.com) was that they would want to go to a place where they could keep doing what they had been doing. So Hitler et al. would go to a place of hate. Unfortunately, he would find himself surrounded by a lot of hateful people with no power to inflict his will on them. Once he released his hate, he could go elsewhere."

This almost exactly how it seemed in Anthony Borgia's "Life in the World Unseen." It also seems to be a principle in Swedenbourgism - that like seeks like, and that those who hate, like to manipulate, etc. are attracted to each other and will be together.

I find it very sad that any suicide would be punished. (Except in the notorious cases of murders who commit suicide, which I think they primarily do just to avoid the consequences of their actions.) But most suicides aren't like that at all, they just feel hopeless. I speak from experience, having lost someone to this - after his action, he went into a coma, and then died, several months later on my birthday (there is synchronicity for you).

"Self-hate is a huge part of depression . . . . . "

I find that strange, since I suffer from clinical depression but have no feelings of self-hate. Disappointment with the world and my fellow homosapiens, most certainly. But self-hate? No.

I agree with Julie. Depression is more likely to be caused by emotional and/or physical pain and the inability to do anything about it. There is a sense of hopelessness and frustration but not self-hate. - AOD

I Googled suicide + self-hate and found this:

"The deep self-loathing that is sometimes present with the darkest depressive episodes is one critical risk factor for suicide. It has been widely reported that Robin Williams experienced it. Despite his success and the adoration of millions of fans around the world, his own personal self-hatred appears to have run deep. In a recent article in Psychology Today, Dr. Mark White stated, “No matter how successful the self-loather is or how much praise he or she receives from other people, something prevents the self-loather from believing he or she has value or worth”. They never find themselves worthy. This self-loathing makes seeking treatment (and consistently remaining on a treatment protocol) challenging."

http://chd.org/depression-self-loathing-suicide/

"My guess about why suicide is "bad" goes back to the information-as-fundamental theory* that Michael and I espouse (in perhaps different forms, though perhaps quite close)."

My own view is similar. I am thinking that the world we live in is of our own creation. The world is constructed by our thoughts, emotions and energies. It is simply a matter of where those are focused. So, if our energy is centered on the negativity that surrounds a suicidal mind set, then we will enter a negative afterlife environment.

Why would becoming disembodied alter our habitual focus?

I don't think it can or does. We would have to put in some work and come to some understandings for that focus to change; just as is true during the "embodied" experience.

This is where I have a conflict with the messianic NDE based quasi-religions. In these, simply moving away from the embodied experience produces an instant enlightenment, salvation and bliss. True that some people report such loftiness in their brief NDEs, but we cannot say that the love and light would be lasting features of the afterlife. I don't think they are, based on ADCs and the Bardo Thordol.

I was diagnosed with clinical depression in the late 1990s and still have recurring bouts - although I don't take medication (because I believe it's a placebo effect). Neither do I seek counselling because I know that my depression is genetically inherited and I know what triggered the first bout.

I can honestly say that never, at any time, has self-loathing featured in my depression. The occasional suicidal thoughts have all centered upon emotional pain caused by seeing 'too far and too deep'. William James suffered similarly; and I'm pretty certain he didn't experience self-loathing either.

My science degree subject was psychology. Believe me, clinical depression is only understood by those who experience it. William James recounted that he knew when his 'melancholy' had returned because he would begin to notice all the mindless, day-to-day, acts of cruelty that are accepted as the norm. For instance, he would walk past the harbour and see fish being thrown from the boats, still alive and wriggling, into baskets. Clearly, they were gasping for oxygen just as we would if we were drowning. That kind of sight deepened his depressive mood.

That's exactly the kind of sudden awareness that tells me when I'm on my way down again. Rather than feeling any kind of self-loathing, I simply feel helpless in the face of the inhumanities that surround us all, but which others appear to be relatively unaffected by. It makes me feel as if I don't belong but have nowhere else to go. Now that's a progressively suicidal state of mind - if one doesn't catch it soon enough.

Here's another link from suicide.org http://www.suicide.org/hopelessness-a-dangerous-warning-sign.html

I would assume there are many varieties of depression, some of which involve self-hatred (basically an extreme case of low self-esteem) and some of which don't.

Here's a list of "Warning Signs for Suicide" from another site. It illustrates the variety of thoughts that can accompany suicidal feelings:

Extreme self-hatred — “You don’t deserve to live.”
Personalized hopelessness — “Nothing matters anymore. You should just kill yourself.”
Pushing away friends and family — “What’s wrong with you? Look at all this trouble you’re causing the people who love you.”
Isolation — “Just be by yourself. You are better off alone.”
Thoughts of not belonging — “You don’t fit in anywhere.”
Thoughts of being a burden to others — “You’re just dragging everyone down. You are such a burden; they would be better off without you.”

http://www.psychalive.org/the-anti-self-vs-the-true-self/

Yes, there are indeed many types of depression. And sometimes the depression is brought about by feelings such as self-loathing, rather than the other way around. Gay people born into a homophobic culture can easily experience self-loathing, as can members of ethnic minority groups.

But my feeling is that depression such as that experienced by William James is solely a consequence of emotional and intellectual sensitivity. One constantly has to look for the good: look up at the stars rather than peer into the abyss.

I think depression will become even more prevalent in modern society when the less immediately astute sit down and take a really good look at what is going on around them. Perhaps then we will have change?

An interesting take on the basis of depression and self-hatred is explained in Alice Miller's "The Drama of the Gifted Child." The title of the book is misleading - it's not about precocious children - it's about the roots of depression. It answers why people who seemingly have it all, such as money and fame - suffer depression.

I do think suicide is a continuum anyway. There's a single act, of course, but then there's slowly poisoning oneself with drugs and alcohol, excessive risk-taking, etc. Hopefully all these folks are healed in the Afterlife.

Re depression and self-hatred, I didn't mean to say or imply that all depression involves self-hatred. I have suffered from it from time to time but have not particularly engaged in self-hatred. My father, on the other hand, was very depressed for much of the time I knew him, and he clearly did experience it at a horrific level.

no one wrote,


||This is where I have a conflict with the messianic NDE based quasi-religions. In these, simply moving away from the embodied experience produces an instant enlightenment, salvation and bliss. True that some people report such loftiness in their brief NDEs, but we cannot say that the love and light would be lasting features of the afterlife. I don't think they are, based on ADCs and the Bardo Thordol.||

I agree. I don't think people necessarily experience the great light as soon as they cross over, either. In fact, I served as a medium this morning for a spirit that seemed to be in a place of rest and quiet contemplation that was not suffused with light. It was dark (but not "dark") and peaceful. It was a great place compared to where he had been in the physical, but it was much different than the communications I have experienced with people who are in what people might call "heaven."

I am pretty sure that Hitler and Stalin did not have very nice experiences once they departed...

"An interesting take on the basis of depression and self-hatred is explained in Alice Miller's "The Drama of the Gifted Child." The title of the book is misleading - it's not about precocious children - it's about the roots of depression. It answers why people who seemingly have it all, such as money and fame - suffer depression."

I used to be at the helm of a National Charity dealing with gifted children (as measured by I Q tests and falling within the top 2%). We ran a survey and found the most common problems experienced by those children were depression and bullying. Children simply *hate* to be different and, because of this, tend to see a positive as a negative . . . . . if you get my drift. The most talented comediennes fall into this category. Most often their skills are honed in the playground as a means of fitting in and becoming accepted.

@Matt: Do you ever receive communications from animals during your sittings?

Julie,

I have on occasion. Actually, one quite recently. It was a pretty decent hit, as I was able to give a specific name.

I also visited a place in the Afterlife where dogs like to go: It was like a Roman forum scene (pretty temples) with dogs running around having fun. It seemed like a place that dogs and humans have been meeting up in the Afterlife for maybe a couple millennia.

I have a good friend, however, who is an animal communications expert and easily connects to them in the Afterlife as well. I can give you her name if you are interested.

Yes, thank you, Matt. I'm very interested. :)

I am a physician and I too struggle with depression and occasional thoughts of suicide. Self hatred is one aspect of it but there are many others. The key component is the inability to feel joy or pleasure or hope and a sense of loneliness and isolation in the world and thoughts of suicide are attractive because they offer the hope of relief from that despair. If there is any afterlife and if what happens there is influenced by a loving inteligence or being of enlightenment, I find it very hard to accept that further despair and pain would be inflicted. I can't accept this idea of having to work through it in the next life. Most people with depression are sensitive, vulnerable, kind to others and to animals but who struggle with the harsh realities of life or have experienced the loss of loved ones or abuse and other trauma or tragedies. Why would we have to endure more suffering after death, that would be a travesty. I believe that idea stems from warped religious teaching and those who have not experienced depression and find suicide confronting.

Off-topic:http://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2015/02/19/newday-wheel-of-fortune-one-letter-guess.cnn

What do you all think -- might there be a psychic explanation to this? Some form of precognition, perhaps? That would be my guess.

Fraud (on the part of the producers) seems unlikely, because this is simply too strange to believe. So what else could explain it?

Actually, I thought about that Wheel of Fortune thing again, and I can see that there might be a more prosaic explanation. If you see a "T" in the middle of a 5-letter word, maybe, if you're very lucky, you think of "match." And then, searching for a long word to precede it, it might not be all that hard to come up with "championship."

I'd hate to be thought of as someone who sees evidence for the paranormal in every little thing. :)

"Most people with depression are sensitive, vulnerable, kind to others and to animals but who struggle with the harsh realities of life or have experienced the loss of loved ones or abuse and other trauma or tragedies."

I think you put that very well, Doug. Despite his suffering, William James wrote that he would rather his sensitive nature than that of a brutish, unfeeling clod - or words to that effect. He writes thusly of his feelings in 'The Varieties of the Religious Experience'.

Hey Bruce, that was really cool about the guy who solved the 17 letter puzzle with one guess. I'm going to go with something psychic going on. Every once in a while stuff like that happens to me. One time at Church there was a guy giving a short talk. Our minister, Darryl, who I am friends with, was sitting in front of me. After the guy finished giving his talk I mumbled sort of under my breath "hard act to follow". At that moment our song leader, Russell, came walking up the isle and he said out loud "hard act to follow." There is no way that Russell could have heard me mumble it before him. Darryl turned around to me and said "how do you do that?" I just shrugged my shoulders. Another time Darryl was reading something from his sermon and stopped because he didn't know how to pronounce a name. I just said out loud "Bhagavad Gita". I don't know how I knew what he was trying to say, but I just knew and I knew how to pronounce it because I have had quite a few Hindu friends from working at the University of Tennessee for 17 years. Some other people in church asked Darryl, "how did Art know that?" And the truth is "I don't know?" Stuff just pops into my head. As it turns out this kind of thing happens to me all the time. When I am watching a movie or TV program quite often I know what is going to happen a few seconds before it happens. It just pops into my head. When it happens it is entirely spontaneous. It is not something I can control and I can't make it happen.

@Bruce: I think it's a fix. If it were genuine then the chap concerned would have looked somewhat dumbstruck . . . . . wouldn't you?

@Doug - I'm not sure the consequences of suicide are necessarily 'decided' by someone in the afterlife (if there is one). It sounds to me more like some sort of process of natural law with a cause and effect relationship. Motive seems to be the key to what happens and I would think there is a vast range of motivations for taking one's own life.

It does seem to be the case, from many after death communications, that the person we are immediately after death is the same as the person a moment beforehand. If we have unresolved issues before death, I don't get the impression that they are suddenly resolved afterwards.

The Creator of the Universe was way smarter than we give It for being. It created a Universe where we learn what we are supposed to learn whether we want to or not. The lessons we are supposed to experience and learn from are embedded in our everyday lives and it holistically imprinted with what it needs to learn regardless of who we are or what we believe or where we live.

Depression is a biochemical hormonal thing. The DNA we inherit makes the proteins in our brain and hormones and biochemistry of the brain are influenced by that biochemistry. Otherwise we would all be exactly the same. Soul stuff is all the same. The only thing that makes us different are our physical bodies and that is a "here" thing and not a "there" thing. The separation that we experience here simply does not exist in heaven. The things that cause separation here do not exist in heaven.

Because of those overwhelming feelings of oneness and connectedness in heaven, due to its holographic nature, when you die and your soul transitions to heaven, you become connected to all the information in the universe. All the problems that were caused by your physical body, and the messed up biochemistry of your brain, are left behind with the body. When the soul leaves the body and becomes connected to the Light, it is healed. In holographic film all the information is spread out throughout the entire piece of film.

"I literally had the feeling that I was everywhere in the universe simultaneously." - mark horton's nde, http://celestial.kuriakon00.com/nde/mark_horton.htm

"I felt an understanding about life, what it was, is. As if it was a dream in itself. It's so very hard to explain this part. I'll try, but my words limit the fullness of it. I don't have the words here, but I understood that it really didn't matter what happened in the life experience, I knew/understood that it was intense, brief, but when we were in it, it seemed like forever. I understood that whatever happened in life, I was really ok, and so were the others here." - Michelle M's NDE, http://www.nderf.org/NDERF/NDE_Experiences/michelle_m%27s_nde.htm

"I had the realization that I was everywhere at the same time...and I mean everywhere. I knew that everything is perfect and happening according to some divine plan, regardless of all the things we see as wrong with the world." from Carl Turner's mystical experience, http://www.beyondreligion.com/su_personal/dreamsvisions-kundalini.htm


Julie said:

"I think it's a fix. If it were genuine then the chap concerned would have looked somewhat dumbstruck . . . . . wouldn't you?"

Actually, if it were a fix, and I were that guy, I would have made damned sure to *look* surprised. :)

@Art

Some cool experiences, Art! I have no doubt they're real because they remind me of my precognitive dreams, which often predict things that will happen immediately after I wake up.

The comments to this entry are closed.