IMG_0569
Blog powered by Typepad

« Book review: Debating Psychic Experience | Main | Upscale »

Comments

Wow, that is a lot of cases. Also, I like the choice of title for the article.

Also, the AWARE people posted this update:
http://www.horizonresearch.org/main_page.php?cat_id=253

Although it isn't really new information so much as them once again reassuring us that they haven't dropped off the face of the planet, and that no, they still can't give us early results.

Oh my God that was the best blog ever! Thank you so much. I have a big smile on my face. It was so uplifting and comforting. We just found out yesterday that Brad, my SIL's brother died two nights ago in a coal truck accident. He came around a curve and there was an accident and instead of plowing into the accident he ran off the road into the woods and hit a bunch of trees and died. If he had just gone ahead and plowed into the accident he probably would have lived but more than likely might have killed the people involved in the wreck ahead of him. Anyway thank you again for the very uplifting blog. I am a huge fan of death bed visions. I need to buy Final Gifts.

Thanks for this excellent blog. And my condolences to your family Art. Playing Devil's Advocate, if certain NDE'ers report seeing relatives who haven't died (I'm not sure of the numbers but it does occur), then statistically some of these relations will have actually died unknowingly to the experients, thus giving this ostensible "extra" evidence. I will have to do some reading to ascertain how likely this is in explaining the "Darien" effect. My guess; not likely.

Hi Michael, just to let you know I just ordered Final Gifts. Looking forward to reading it.

Glad that people liked the post. Of course, all these stories are anecdotal, so they don't really count as hard evidence. Then again, hard evidence can be tough to come by in the social sciences, which often rely on reports of observers (e.g., anthropologists in the wild).

Also, my condolences to Art and his family.

and let us not forget the now aged "At the Hour of Death" (http://www.amazon.co.uk/At-Hour-Death-Karlis-Osis/dp/0803893868/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1303278561&sr=1-1#_) by Erlendur Haraldsson and the late Karlis Osis.

Great post as always, Michael. Art, sorry to hear that news. Best to your family.

I found the following (online) book fascinating as the author recounts events that mostly predate spiritualism:
Footfalls on the Boundary of Another World
Robert Dale Owen.1859
(open library.org)(500+ pages)
In 1661 , in the house of Mr.Mompesson, there were knocks and when asked to respond to questions"...it would exactly answer in drumming anything that was beaten or asked for" (page217)
The author's main concern was to present events that had "sufficient authentication"

I should have added
J.P.Lippincott & Co. 1860
pdf

The copy I have is dated 1872.

In 1880 Robert Dale Owen followed it up with "The Debatable Land".

Spiritualism has always been although Modern Spiritualism is reckoned from 1848.

Thanks for posting this Michael, very interesting! As you point out, it's not "hard evidence" from a lab, but much of what we know isn't obtained from a lab either--we'd understand very little about wildlife, for instance, if we just studied animals in a lab.

"we'd understand very little about wildlife, for instance, if we just studied animals in a lab."

Good analogy!

Nah....it's no good...old evidence...can't be trusted you see !
Of course, newish evidence (Morse) is no good either...he's not to be trusted because every sensible person knows perfectly well that these things can't happen. Therefore they don't happen.

Now what evidence would you like me to look at now ? :)

"the women attending to her . . . saw no response when they put live coals to her feet."

Gets me wondering if that was standard medical procedure in those days. If so, it may not be surprising that so few NDErs of that era chose to return. :o)

Bruce Moen's Afterlife Journeys offer a treasure trove of information into the workings of the afterlife realms. If you aren't aware of his work, you will be pleasantly surprised by his thoughts and studies. It filled many gaps in for me and answered many questions I didn't even know how to ask.
Thanks for your blog. I am fascinated by these stories and connections.

Bruce Moen's work is a favorite of mine.

Another early source recounting deathbed (and other) visions of dying or previously deceased friends and relatives, most of whom were not known to the seer be dead or dying: “The night side of nature, or, Ghosts and ghost seers” (1848) by Catherine Crowe is available online in PDF facsimile scans or plain text at:
http://www.archive.org/details/nightsideofnatur01crowiala

This book has dozens of accounts, mostly recounted directly to the author by those who saw a double of a familiar person at around the time of that person’s death, often hundreds or thousands of miles away. This goes beyond NDEs seeing deceased people to healthy witnesses seeing doubles of distant dying or recently deceased acquaintances.

There are books with many anecdotes like these which are available free on line:

Frederic William Henry Myers: "Human Personality and its Survival of Bodily Death"

Edmund Gurney: "Phantasms of the Living"

You can find them on google books and archive.org

I have links on my web site:

http://sites.google.com/site/chs4o8pt/summary_of_evidence#summary_evidence_on_line_classics

It's a long link, if the link doesn't come through correctly, click on the "posted by link" below for the same url.

I also posted many such anecdotes to a blog at:

http://ncu9na.blogspot.com/

I'm reading Final Gifts, by Maggie Callanan and Patricia Kelley right now, about halfway through it, and it's really good! Two thumbs up! It's a keeper. Won't be trading it in at the used book store.

Of course there's always some anorack who has to point out that it was actually Balboa: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasco_N%C3%BA%C3%B1ez_de_Balboa

Jane B:

That AWARE announcement seems to be energetically downplaying the whole topic of NDEs, never mind their veridical status. "[C]ognitive and mental outcomes after cardiac arrest"?

Interesting. I didn't know that Keats got it wrong.

The comments to this entry are closed.